Beer Glass for each Type of Beer

There are several different styles of glasses for beer drinking. You can find a description of each type of glass here. Or you can just look at the images for the beer you are interested and get the shape of the glass that is recommended for that particular beer style.

Pale Lager

1A. American Light Lager  Pub Glass
1B. American Lager Pub Glass
2A. International Pale Lager Tall Beer Glass
3A. Czech Pale Lager Tall Beer Glass
4A. Munich Helles Tall Beer Glass
4B. Festbier Stein or Mug Pub Glass
5A. German Leichtbier Tall Beer Glass
5C. Helles Exportbier Tall Beer Glass flute
7C. Kellerbier (Pale Kellerbier) Pub Glass Stein or Mug

Pilsner

3B. Czech Premium Pale Lager Tall Beer Glass Pub Glass
5D. German Pils Tall Beer Glass
27. Historical Beer (PreProhibition Lager) Pub Glass

Amber Lager

2B. International Amber Lager Pub Glass Tall Beer Glass
3C. Czech Amber Lager Pub Glass Tall Beer Glass
6B. Rauchbier Stein or Mug
7A. Vienna Lager Stein or Mug Tall Beer Glass
7C. Kellerbier (Amber Kellerbier) Stein or Mug
19B. California Common Tall Beer Glass Pub Glass Stein or Mug

Dark Lager

2C. International Dark Lager Tall Beer Glass Pub Glass
3D. Czech Dark Lager Tall Beer Glass Pub Glass
8A. Munich Dunkel Tall Beer Glass
8B. Schwarzbier Tall Beer Glass flute

Bock

4C. Helles Bock Stein or Mug Tall Beer Glass flute
6C. Dunkles Bock Stein or Mug Pub Glass
9A. Doppelbock Stein or Mug Tall Beer Glass
9B. Eisbock oversized-wine-glass flute

Pale Ale

1C. Cream Ale Stein or Mug Pub Glass
5B. Kölsch Stein or Mug Pub Glass
12A. British Golden Ale Pub Glass
12B. Australian Sparkling Ale Pub Glass
18A. Blonde Ale Stein or Mug Pub Glass
18B. American Pale Ale Stein or Mug Pub Glass
24B. Belgian Pale Ale oversized-wine-glass snifter Belgian Beer Glass
25A. Belgian Blond Ale snifter Belgian Beer Glass oversized-wine-glass
25B. Saison Stein or Mug Pub Glass
26A. Trappist Single Pub Glass Tall Beer Glass

IPA

12C. English IPA Stein or Mug Pub Glass
21A. American IPA Stein or Mug Pub Glass
21B. Specialty IPA (all) Stein or Mug Pub Glass
22A. Double IPA snifter Belgian Beer Glass oversized-wine-glass

Amber Lager

7B. Altbier stange
11A. Ordinary Bitter Stein or Mug Pub Glass
11B. Best Bitter Stein or Mug Pub Glass
11C. Strong Bitter Pub Glass
14A. Scottish Light Stein or Mug Pub Glass
14B. Scottish Heavy Pub Glass snifter Belgian Beer Glass
14C. Scottish Export Tall Beer Glass flute
15A. Irish Red Ale Pub Glass
19A. American Amber Ale Stein or Mug Tall Beer Glass Pub Glass
24C. Bière de Garde Belgian Beer Glass oversized-wine-glass
26B. Belgian Dubbel goblet
27. Historical Beer (Kentucky Common) Pub Glass Stein or Mug

Brown Ale

13A. Dark Mild Stein or Mug Pub Glass
13B. British Brown Ale Stein or Mug Pub Glass
19C. American Brown Ale Stein or Mug Pub Glass
27. Historical Beer (London Brown Ale) Stein or Mug Pub Glass

Porter

9C. Baltic Porter Stein or Mug Pub Glass
13C. English Porter Stein or Mug Pub Glass
20A. American Porter Stein or Mug Pub Glass
27. Historical Beer (Pre-Prohibition Porter) Stein or Mug Pub Glass

Stout

15B. Irish Stout Stein or Mug Pub Glass
15C. Irish Extra Stout Stein or Mug Pub Glass
16A. Sweet Stout Stein or Mug Pub Glass
16B. Oatmeal Stout Stein or Mug Pub Glass
16C. Tropical Stout Stein or Mug Pub Glass
16D. Foreign Extra Stout Stein or Mug Pub Glass
20B. American Stout Stein or Mug Pub Glass
20C. Imperial Stout Pub Glass snifter oversized-wine-glass

Strong Ale

17A. British Strong Ale Stein or Mug
17B. Old Ale Pub Glass snifter oversized-wine-glass
17C. Wee Heavy Pub Glass snifter Belgian Beer Glass
17D. English Barleywine Pub Glass snifter
22B. American Strong Ale Stein or Mug Pub Glass snifter
22C. American Barleywine Pub Glass snifter
22D. Wheatwine snifter oversized-wine-glass
25C. Belgian Golden Strong Ale oversized-wine-glass goblet snifter
26C. Belgian Tripel snifter goblet
26D. Belgian Dark Strong Ale snifter Belgian Beer Glass oversized-wine-glass

Wheat Beer

1D. American Wheat Beer Pub Glass Stein or Mug
10A. Weissbier Pub Glass goblet
10B. Dunkles Weissbier Pub Glass Stein or Mug
10C. Weizenbock weizen flute
23A. Berliner Weisse goblet Pub Glass
23D. Lambic snifter stange flute
23E. Gueuze snifter stange Belgian Beer Glass
23F. Fruit Lambic snifter stange Belgian Beer Glass
24A. Witbier Stein or Mug Tall Beer Glass Pub Glass
27. Historical Beer (Gose) stange weizen
27. Historical Beer (Piwo Grodziskie) Stein or Mug Pub Glass
27. Historical Beer (Lichtenhainer) stange weizen
27. Historical Beer (Roggenbier) weizen
27. Historical Beer (Sahti) weizen flute

Sour Ale

23B. Flanders Red snifter Belgian Beer Glass flute
23C. Oud Bruin snifter Belgian Beer Glass flute

Specialty Beer

34A. Clone Beer
34B. Mixed-Style
34C. Experimental Beer

General Beer Styles by Category

Beer Styles Sorted Using Style Family
This system uses new categories based on the style family or beer style name without regard to country of origin or history and is based primarily on color and yeast. There are fewer categories since the categories are broader. The number to the left of the style is the BJCP category number. You can see information on the BJCP category by hovering over the “Beer Styles” in the menu on the left then clicking the category you are interested in.

Pale Lager
1A. American Light Lager
1B. American Lager
2A. International Pale Lager
3A. Czech Pale Lager
4A. Munich Helles
4B. Festbier
5A. German Leichtbier
5C. Helles Exportbier
7C. Kellerbier (Pale Kellerbier)

Pilsner
3B. Czech Premium Pale Lager
5D. German Pils
27. Historical Beer (PreProhibition Lager)

Amber Lager
2B. International Amber Lager
3C. Czech Amber Lager
6A. Märzen
6B. Rauchbier
7A. Vienna Lager
7C. Kellerbier (Amber Kellerbier)
19B. California Common

Dark Lager
2C. International Dark Lager
3D. Czech Dark Lager
8A. Munich Dunkel
8B. Schwarzbier

Bock
4C. Helles Bock
6C. Dunkles Bock
9A. Doppelbock
9B. Eisbock

Pale Ale
1C. Cream Ale
5B. Kölsch
12A. British Golden Ale
12B. Australian Sparkling Ale
18A. Blonde Ale
18B. American Pale Ale
24B. Belgian Pale Ale
25A. Belgian Blond Ale
25B. Saison
26A. Trappist Single

IPA
12C. English IPA
21A. American IPA
21B. Specialty IPA (all)
22A. Double IPA

Amber Ale
7B. Altbier
11A. Ordinary Bitter
11B. Best Bitter
11C. Strong Bitter
14A. Scottish Light
14B. Scottish Heavy
14C. Scottish Export
15A. Irish Red Ale
19A. American Amber Ale
24C. Bière de Garde
26B. Belgian Dubbel
27. Historical Beer (Kentucky Common)

Brown Ale
13A. Dark Mild
13B. British Brown Ale
19C. American Brown Ale
27. Historical Beer (London Brown Ale)

Porter
9C. Baltic Porter
13C. English Porter
20A. American Porter
27. Historical Beer (Pre-Prohibition Porter)

Stout
15B. Irish Stout
15C. Irish Extra Stout
16A. Sweet Stout
16B. Oatmeal Stout
16C. Tropical Stout
16D. Foreign Extra Stout
20B. American Stout
20C. Imperial Stout

Strong Ale
17A. British Strong Ale
17B. Old Ale
17C. Wee Heavy
17D. English Barleywine
22B. American Strong Ale
22C. American Barleywine
22D. Wheatwine
25C. Belgian Golden Strong Ale
26C. Belgian Tripel
26D. Belgian Dark Strong Ale

Wheat Beer
1D. American Wheat Beer
10A. Weissbier
10B. Dunkles Weissbier
10C. Weizenbock
23A. Berliner Weisse
23D. Lambic
23E. Gueuze
23F. Fruit Lambic
24A. Witbier
27. Historical Beer (Gose)
27. Historical Beer (Piwo Grodziskie)
27. Historical Beer (Lichtenhainer)
27. Historical Beer (Roggenbier)
27. Historical Beer (Sahti)

Sour Ale
23B. Flanders Red
23C. Oud Bruin

Specialty Beer
34A. Clone Beer
34B. Mixed-Style beer
34C. Experimental Beer

Beer Glasses for Each Style

This article describes the shape of the various glasses for the best experience when drinking beer. If you just want to know the proper shape of the glass you should use for a particular beer you can find that information here.

 

American Pint

 

Pub Glass

The American pint glass is the most common beer glass in the USA. It is cone-shaped and typically holds 16oz to 20oz of beer. The simple design, the ease of stacking and durability are the features that made this style of pint glass so popular in post-prohibition American bars and restaurants. These glasses are made from thick glass and built to last. This helps with maintaining cold temperatures. The cone shape is simple but the wide rim does allow for good aroma release.

Use to Serve:
American Ales
American Lagers
American IPAs
American Pilsners
Light Lagers
Beer Mugs or Krugs

Stein or Mug
Stein or Mug

Beer mugs are the most common style of beer glasses. This classic glassware type evolved from the German beer stein. When commercial glassware production began in Europe, the stone mug was replaced by glassware. The design of a beer mugs serves two purposes; durability and insulation. Beer mugs typically are made with thick glass with a study handle. The thickness of the glass helps keeps the beer cold and the handle allows for a firm grip and to prevent heat transfer from your hand to the beer. The wide mouth of the mug allows for plenty of aroma to be released.
Use to Serve:

American Ales
American Lagers
English Ales
German Lagers
Pilsners (substitution for pilsner glass or pokal glass)

 

 

Chalice and Goblet Beer Glasses

gobletGoblets and chalices are large, stemmed bowl shaped glasses adequate for serving Belgian ales, German doppelbocks and eisbocks and other big sipping beers (high ABV). The distinction between goblet and a chalice beer glass is typically in the glass thickness but the term is somewhat interchangeable. Goblet beer glasses tend to be more delicate and thin, while the chalice is heavy and thick walled. Some chalices are even etched on the bottom of the bowl of the glass to attract carbon dioxide and provide a stream of bubbles for maintaining a nice head.
Use to Serve:

Belgian Ales
Belgian IPAs
Belgian Dubbels
Belgian Tripels
Belgian Quadrupels
Belgian Trappist Ales
Imperial IPAs
Imperial Stouts
German Bocks
German Maibocks
Most other Big beers (high ABV)

 

Flute Beer Glasses

fluteA flute glass is the preferred serving vessel for Belgian lambics and fruit beers. The narrow shape helps maintain carbonation, while providing a strong aromatic front. Flute glasses display the lively carbonation, sparkling color and soft lacing of this distinct style.
Use to Serve:

Biere de Champagne
Biere Brut
Eisbock
Fruit Beers
Gueuze
Krieks
Lambics
Pilsners
Red Ales
Schwarzbier

 

Nonic Glasses

nonicA nonic glass is an English style pint glass that has a curved lip about two inches from the top of the glass. A nonic typically holds an imperial pint or 20 oz. This glass is typically used to serve English ales and English Lagers.

Use to Serve:

American Lagers
Black Ales
Blonde Ales
Brown Ales
California Common or Steam Beer
Cream Ales
English Bitter
Extra Special Bitters (ESB)
India Pale Ales (IPA)
Milk and Chocolate Stouts
Oatmeal Stouts
Old Ales
Pale Ales (APA)
Porters
Pumpkin Ales
Red Ales
Rye Beers
Saisonse
Stout
Winter Warmers

 

Over-sized Wine Glasses

oversized-wine-glassThe over-sized wine glass is just that, an big wine glass but it’s used for serving strong or high gravity beer styles. Use this glass when a chalice or goblet isn’t readily available.
Use to Serve:

Double IPA
Barleywine
Belgian Doubles
Triples and Quads
Strong Ales
Most high gravity (ABV) or big beers

 

Pilsner Glass

Tall Beer Glass
Tall Beer Glass

A pilsner glass is a glass is used to serve many types of light beers, but is intended for its namesake, the pilsner. Pilsner glasses can be smaller than a pint glass, usually in 10oz or 16oz sizes. They are tall and slender and tapered. Weizen glasses are often mistakenly referred to as Pilsner glasses, but a true Pilsner glass has an even taper without curvature. Pilsner glasses are made to showcase the color, effervescence and clarity of the Pilsner style, as well as maintain a nice head. This is a classic beer glass style that was widely used in both the USA and Europe prior to Prohibition.
Use to Serve:

American Pilsners
Baltic Pilsners
German Pilsners
Czech Pilsners
Light Lagers

 

Snifter Beer Glasses

snifterThe snifter beer glass is typically used for serving brandy and cognac, a snifter is perfect for capturing the volatiles of aromatic beers, such as Belgian ales, India pale ales, barleywines and wheat wines. The shape helps trap the volatiles, while allowing swirling to agitate them and produce an intense aroma. The short stem and wide bowl fit nicely in your hand and allow the warmth from your hand to gently warm the beer to the optimal serving temperature.
Use to Serve:

Barleywine
Belgian Triples
Belgian Quads
Bocks
Double Bocks
Imperial Ales
Imperial Stouts
Strong Ales
Scotch Ales (substitute for thistle glass)
Most beers with over 7% abv.

 

Stange Beer Glasses

stangeThe stange beer glass or pole glass is a simple cylinder shaped glass typically used for German Kolsch and Alt beers. Stange glasses tend to be smaller in size because the beer is meant to be consumed quickly while still cold.
Use to Serve:

Alts
German Kolsch
Gose
Gueuze

 

Beer Steins

steinA beer stein is a traditionally German beer tankard or mug, made of pewter, silver, wood, porcelain, earthenware or glassware, and usually with a hinged lid and levered thumb lift. The lid was implemented during the age of the Black Plague, to prevent flies from getting into the beer.
Use to Serve:

American Ales
American Lagers
German Lagers
German Ales
English Ales
English Lagers

 

Thistle Beer Glasses

thistleA thistle beer glass is used for Scottish ales. The glass is shaped like a thistle blossom, hence the name. The bowl of the glass is large and fit well in your hand while the flared top allows for the release of aroma.
Use to Serve:

Scotch Ale AKA Wee Heavy
Barleywine

 

Tulip Beer Glasses

920284A tulip beer glass not only helps trap the aroma, but also aids in maintaining large heads, creating a visual and olfactory sensation. The body is bulbous, but the top flares out to form a lip which helps head retention. Good for serving hoppy beer styles such as India Pale Ales (IPAs) and other aromatic beers.
Use to Serve:

Belgian Ales
Biere de Garde
India Pale Ales (IPAs)
Pale Ales
Scotch Ale AKA Wee Heavy (substitute for thistle glass)
Strong Ales

Pint Sized Tulip Glasses are also available:
The tulip pint glass is commonly used in Ireland and England to serve ales. The glass is flared from the middle to the rim of the beer glass. They are also called Tulip Pint Glasses.
Use to Serve:

Irish Stouts
Irish Ales
Porters
Red Ales
Cream Ales
English Ales

 

Wheat Beer Glasses

weizenA wheat beer glass is a glass used to serve wheat beer, known also as Weizenbier or Weissbier. This German-style glass generally holds 0.5 liters (16 oz) with room for foam or “head”. It is much taller than a pint glass, and starts out very skinny before widening out slightly at the top. It is said that the glass is tapered to trap yeast at the bottom of the glass. In other countries such as Belgium, the glass may be 0.25 liters or 0.33 liters. This tall glass provides room for the often thick, fluffy heads produced by the style, which traps aromas and is visually pleasing.
Use to Serve:

All Wheat Beers
Dunkelweizen
Hefeweizen
Kristalweizen
Weizenbock
White Ales
Belgian Wit (substitution for tumbler)
Gose
Pilsner (substitution for pilsner glass or pokal glass)

 

Willybecher Glasses

willybecherThe willybecher (or willibecher) is the standard beer glass in Germany. They typically hold 500 milliliters or 16.9 ounces of beer. A willybecher has a thick glass bottom and is tapered in the middle. The glass is used to serve German lagers.
Use to Serve:

German black beer or Schwarzbier
Helles
Helles Bock
Maibock
Marzen
Oktoberfestbier
Rauchbier
Pils or Pilsener

Acronyms Used in Brewing

There are lots of acronyms used in the brewing community. This is a list of some of the more common ones used:

AA – Alpha acid

AAA – American Amber Ale

AAE – alpha amylase enzyme

AAU – Alpha Acid Unit

ABV – Alcohol By Volume

ABW – Alcohol By Weight

AFAIK – As Far As I Know

AFD – Alcohol Free Day

AG – All Grain

AHA – American Homebrewers Association

AHB – Aussie Home Brewer

ANAWBS – Australian National Amateur Wine and Beer Show

APA – American Pale Ale

ATM – At The Moment

BAE – beta amylase enzyme

BB – Brew Booster

Bbl – Barrel (31 gallons in U.S.)

BE – Brew Enhancer – Coopers – also BE2

BIAB – Brew in a Bag

BIN – Buy It Now – Ebay.

BJCP – Beer Judge Certification Program

BOAB – Brewing On A Budget

BP – BrewPub

BS – BullS**t

BTU – British thermal units

BTW – By The Way

BYO – Brew Your Own (print magazine) – www.BYO.com

CaCO3 – calcium carbonate (chalk)

CAMRA – Campaign for Real Ale

CAP – Classic American Pilsner

CaSO4 – calcium sulfate (gypsum)

CC – Cold Condition

CF – Counter Flow

CFC – Counter Flow Chiller

CFWC – Counter Flow Wort Chiller

CO – carbon monoxide

CO2 – Carbon Dioxide

CP – Charlie Papazian

CPA – Coopers (Original) Pale Ale

CPBF – Counter Pressure Bottle Filler

CPF – Counter Pressure Filler

CPVC – chlorinated polyvinyl choloride (plastic)

CSA – Cold Side Aeration

CSA – Coopers Sparking Ale

DAB – Dortmunder Actien Brauerei

DCL – DCL Yeast – formerly Fermentis – Safale, Saflager etc.

DCS – Dried Corn Syrup (MaltoDextrin)

DE – diatamacious earth (filter)

DE – diastatic enzyme

DLM – Dry Light Malt (Extract)

DM – Dave Miller

DME – Dry Malt Extract

DME – dark malt extract (uncommon)

DME – diastatic malt extract (uncommon)

DMS – DiMethyl Sulfide

DMSO – dimethyl sulfoxide

DWC – DeWolf Cosyns (malting company)

EBC – European Brewers Convention, a measure of grains/beer colour. See SRM

EE – extract efficiency (uncommon)

EF – Edmund Fitzgerald Robust Porter, brewed by the Great Lakes Brewing Company.

EKG – East Kent Goldings (hop variety)

ESB – Extra/English Special Bitter

FAN – Free Amino-Nitrogen

FAQ – frequently asked question

FB – False Bottom (lautering)

FDA – United States Food & Drug Administration

FFS – For F*** Sake

FG – Finished/Final Gravity (see also OG and SG)

FV – fermentation vessel

FWH – First wort hopping

FWIW – For What It’s Worth

FYI – For Your Information

GABF – Great American Beer Festival

GBBF – Great British Beer Festival

GPM – gallons per minute

HB – Home Brew!

HBD – Homebrew Digest

HBS – Home Brew Store/Shop

HBU – Homebrew Bittering Unit r

HDPE – High Density PolyEthylene – a plastic, used for fermentors, stirring spoons, etc.

HERMS – Heat Exchange Recirculating Mash System

HEX – Heat Exchange

HLB – hot liquor bath

HLT – Hot liquor tank

HNO3 – nitric acid

HP – High Pressure

HSA – Hot side aeration

HTB – How To Brew – John Palmer’s free online(print avail.) book.

IBU – International Bittering Unit

ID – internal diameter

IIRC – If I Remember Correctly

IMC – International Malting Company

IMHO – In My Humble/Honest Opinion

IMO – In My Opinion

IOW – in other words

IPA – India Pale Ale

IRA – Irish Red Ale

K&B or KnB – Kits and Bits – Kit of hopped malt extract, extra malt extract, extra hops and special yeast.

K&K or K+K – Kit (hopped malt extract) and Kilo (sugar)

L – degree Lovibond (measure of color)

LA – low alcohol

LC – Little Creatures

LHBS – Local Home Brew Store/Shop

LME – Liquid Malt Extract

LMK – Let Me Know

LOL – Laughing Out Loud

LPG – liquid propane gas

LT – lauter tun

MBAA – Master Brewers Association of America

MD – MaltoDextrin

MgSO4 – magnesium sulfate (epsom salt)

MLT – Mash & Lauter Tun

MM – malt mill

MO – Maris Otter – variety of Barley

MSDS – Material Safety Data Sheet

MT – mash tun

N2 – nitrogen

NA – non-alcoholic

NaCHO3 – sodium bicarbonate (baking soda)

NaCl – sodium chloride (table salt)

NB – Northern Brewer hops

NC – ‘No Chill’ method for cooling boiled wort

NE – NorthEast (or New England) region of USA

NG – natural gas

NHC – National Homebrew Competition (in USA)

O2 – oxygen

OD – outer diameter

OG – Original Gravity (see also FG and SG)

OLHBS – OnLine HomeBrew Store/Shop

OMG – Oh My God

OPA – Original Pale Ale (Coopers)

OTOH – On The Other Hand

P – Plato (density measurement, see also SG)

PET – PolyEthylene Terephthalate

pH – potential hydrogen (measure of acidity)

PITA – Pain In The Ass

PKU – Please Keep Up

PM – Private/Personal Message

PNW – Pacific Northwest (region of USA)

ppg – points per gallon (extract efficiency)

ppm – part per million (mg/l)

PS – PostScript

PSI – pounds per square inch (pressure)

PVC – PolyVinylChloride – Vinyl tubing

R2D – Ready to Drink

RB – Roasted Barley

RCD – Residual-Current Device

RDWHAHB – Relax, Don’t Worry, Have A Home Brew!

RFC – request for comment

RIMS – Recirculating Infusion Mash System

RIS – Russian imperial stout

RO – Reverse Osmosis (water filtration)

ROFL – Rolling On Floor Laughing

ROFLMAO – ROFL My Ass Off

RTFM – read the flaming manual

SG – Specific Gravity (see also FG and OG)

SMM – S-methyl methionine

SNPA – Sierra Nevada Pale Ale

SRM – Standard Reference Method (Standard for USA), see Lovibond and EBC

SS – Stainless Steel

SS – SodaStream

SWMBO – She Who Must Be Obeyed (aka: the missus or The Wife)

TBH – To Be Honest … blah blah blah

TIA – thanks in advance

TKT – Thread Killa Thread

TR – Tap Room

TSP – TriSodium Phosphate -r

TW – Torrified Wheat – puffed wheat.

TWOC – Tina’s World Of Crafts(!) HBS in Perth

USFDA – United States Food & Drug Administration

WCB – West Coast Brewers.

WL – White Labs (also WLP)

WTF – What The F*$! ?

WWW – world wide web

WY – Wyeast

YMMV – Your Mileage May Vary