Fruit Beer Category

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The Fruit Beer category is for beer made with any fruit or combination of fruit under the definitions of this category. The culinary, not botanical, definition of fruit is used here–fleshy, seed-associated structures of plants that are sweet or sour, and edible in the raw state. Examples include pome fruit (apple, pear, quince), stone fruit (cherry, plum, peach, apricot, mango, etc.), berries (any fruit with the word ‘berry’ in it), currants, citrus fruit, dried fruit (dates, prunes, raisins, etc.), tropical fruit (banana, pineapple, guava, papaya, etc.), figs, pomegranate, prickly pear, and so on. It does not mean spices, herbs, or vegetables as defined in Category 30, especially botanical fruit treated as culinary vegetables. Basically, if you have to justify a fruit using the word “technically” as part of the description, then that’s not what we mean.

29A. Fruit Beer

29B. Fruit and Spice Beer

29C. Specialty Fruit Beer

Beer Styles

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Categories are the major groupings of styles are artificial constructs that represent a collection of individual sub-categories, or beer styles that may or may not have any historical, geographic, or traditional relationship with each other. Do not infer that membership in a style category somehow relates beer styles with each other. The only reason they are grouped together is to assist with managing the scale and complexity of beer competitions. The names given to the groupings are for competition purposes only, and may not be used in any broader contexts in the beer and brewing industries.

BJCP Styles Quick Reference Table

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BJCP Category BJCP Stle IBU Range SRM Range OG Range FG Range ABV% Range
1 American Light Lager 8–12 2–3 1.028–1.040 0.998–1.008 2.8–4.2%
1 American Lager 8–18 2–4 1.040–1.050 1.004–1.010 4.2–5.3%
1 Cream Ale 8–20 2.5–5 1.042–1.055 1.006–1.012 4.2–5.6%
1 American Wheat Beer 15–30 3–6 1.040–1.055 1.008–1.013 4.0–5.5%
2 International Pale Lager 18–25 2–6 1.042–1.050 1.008–1.012 4.6–6.0%
2 International Amber Lager 8–25 7–14 1.042–1.055 1.008–1.014 4.6–6.0%
2 International Dark Lager 8–20 14–22 1.044–1.056 1.008–1.012 4.2–6.0%
3 Czech Pale Lager 20–35 3–6 1.028–1.044 1.008–1.014 3.0–4.1%
3 Czech Premium Pale Lager 30–45 3.5–6 1.044–1.060 1.013–1.017 4.2–5.8%
3 Czech Amber Lager 20–35 10–16 1.044–1.060 1.013–1.017 4.4–5.8%
3 Czech Dark Lager 18–34 14–35 1.044–1.060 1.013–1.017 4.4–5.8%
4 Munich Helles 16–22 3–5 1.044–1.048 1.006–1.012 4.7–5.4%
4 Festbier 18–25 4–7 1.054–1.057 1.010–1.012 5.8–6.3%
4 Helles Bock 23–35 6–11 1.064–1.072 1.011–1.018 6.3–7.4%
5 German Leichtbier 15–28 2–5 1.026–1.034 1.006–1.010 2.4–3.6%
5 Kölsch 18–30 3.5–5 1.044–1.050 1.007–1.011 4.4–5.2%
5 German Helles Exportbier 20–30 4–7 1.048–1.056 1.010–1.015 4.8–6.0%
5 German Pils 22–40 2–5 1.044–1.050 1.008–1.013 4.4–5.2%
6 Märzen 18–24 8–17 1.054–1.060 1.010–1.014 5.8–6.3%
6 Rauchbier 20–30 12–22 1.050–1.057 1.012–1.016 4.8–6%
6 Dunkles Bock 20–27 14–22 1.064–1.072 1.013–1.019 6.3–7.2%
7 Vienna Lager 18–30 9–15 1.048–1.055 1.010–1.014 4.7–5.5%
7 Altbier 25–50 11–17 1.044–1.052 1.008–1.014 4.3–5.5%
7 Kellerbier 20–35 3–7 1.045–1.051 1.008–1.012 4.7–5.4%
7 Amber Kellerbier 25–40 7–17 1.048–1.054 1.012–1.016 4.8–5.4%
8 Munich Dunkel 18–28 14–28 1.048–1.056 1.010–1.016 4.5–5.6%
8 Schwarzbier 20–30 17–30 1.046–1.052 1.010–1.016 4.4–5.4%
9 Doppelbock 16–26 6–25 1.072–1.112 1.016–1.024 7.0–10.0%
9 Eisbock 25–35 18–30 1.078–1.120 1.020–1.035 9.0–14.0%
9 Baltic Porter 20–40 17–30 1.060–1.090 1.016–1.024 6.5–9.5%
10 Weissbier 8–15 2–6 1.044–1.052 1.010–1.014 4.3–5.6%
10 Dunkles Weissbier 10–18 14–23 1.044–1.056 1.010–1.014 4.3–5.6%
10 Weizenbock 15–30 6–25 1.064–1.090 1.015–1.022 6.5–9.0%
11 Ordinary Bitter 25–35 8–14 1.030–1.039 1.007–1.011 3.2–3.8%
11 Best Bitter 25–40 8–16 1.040–1.048 1.008–1.012 3.8–4.6%
11 Strong Bitter 30–50 8–18 1.048–1.060 1.010–1.016 4.6–6.2%
12 British Golden Ale 20–45 2–6 1.038–1.053 1.006–1.012 3.8–5.0%
12 Australian Sparkling Ale 20–35 4–7 1.038–1.050 1.004–1.006 4.5–6.0%
12 English IPA 40–60 6–14 1.050–1.075 1.010–1.018 5.0–7.5%
13 Dark Mild 10–25 12–25 1.030–1.038 1.008–1.013 3.0–3.8%
13 British Brown Ale 20–30 12–22 1.040–1.052 1.008–1.013 4.2–5.4%
13 English Porter 18–35 20–30 1.040–1.052 1.008–1.014 4.0–5.4%
14 Scottish Light 10–20 17–22 1.030–1.035 1.010–1.013 2.5–3.2%
14 Scottish Heavy 10–20 13–22 1.035–1.040 1.010–1.015 3.2–3.9%
14 Scottish Export 15–30 13–22 1.040–1.060 1.010–1.016 3.9–6.0%
15 Irish Red Ale 18–28 9–14 1.036–1.046 1.010–1.014 3.8–5.0%
15 Irish Stout 25–45 25–40 1.036–1.044 1.007–1.011 4.0–4.5%
15 Irish Extra Stout 35–50 25–40 1.052–1.062 1.010–1.014 5.5–6.5%
16 Sweet Stout 20–40 30–40 1.044–1.060 1.012–1.024 4.0–6.0%
16 Oatmeal Stout 25–40 22–40 1.045–1.065 1.010–1.018 4.2–5.9%
16 Tropical Stout 30–50 30–40 1.056–1.075 1.010–1.018 5.5–8.0%
16 Foreign Extra Stout 50–70 30–40 1.056–1.075 1.010–1.018 6.3–8.0%
17 British Strong Ale 30–60 8–22 1.055–1.080 1.015–1.022 5.5–8.0%
17 Old Ale 30–60 10–22 1.055–1.088 1.015–1.022 5.5–9.0%
17 Wee Heavy 17–35 14–25 1.070–1.130 1.018–1.040 6.5–10.0%
17 English Barleywine 35–70 8–22 1.080–1.120 1.018–1.030 8.0–12.0%
18 Blonde Ale 15–28 3–6 1.038–1.054 1.008–1.013 3.8–5.5%
18 American Pale Ale 30–50 5–10 1.045–1.060 1.010–1.015 4.5–6.2%
19 American Amber Ale 25–40 10–17 1.045–1.060 1.010–1.015 4.5–6.2%
19 California Common 30–45 10–14 1.048–1.054 1.011–1.014 4.5–5.5%
19 American Brown Ale 20–30 18–35 1.045–1.060 1.010–1.016 4.3–6.2%
20 American Porter 25–50 22–40 1.050–1.070 1.012–1.018 4.8–6.5%
20 American Stout 35–75 30–40 1.050–1.075 1.010–1.022 5.0–7.0%
20 Imperial Stout 50–90 30–40 1.075–1.115 1.018–1.030 8.0–12.0%
21 American IPA 40–70 6–14 1.056–1.070 1.008–1.014 5.5–7.5%
21 Belgian IPA 50–100 5–15 1.058–1.080 1.008–1.016 6.2–9.5%
21 Black IPA 50–90 25–40 1.050–1.085 1.010–1.018 5.5–9.0%
21 Brown IPA 40–70 11–19 1.056–1.070 1.008–1.016 5.5–7.5%
21 Red IPA 40–70 11–19 1.056–1.070 1.008–1.016 5.5–7.5%
21 Rye IPA 50–75 6–14 1.056–1.075 1.008–1.014 5.5–8.0%
21 White IPA 40–70 5–8 1.056–1.065 1.010–1.016 5.5–7.0%
22 Double IPA 60–120 6–14 1.065–1.085 1.008–1.018 7.5–10.0%
22 American Strong Ale 50–100 7–19 1.062–1.090 1.014–1.024 6.3–10.0%
22 American Barleywine 50–100 10–19 1.080–1.120 1.016–1.030 8.0–12.0%
22 Wheatwine 30–60 8–15 1.080–1.120 1.016–1.030 8.0–12.0%
23 Berliner Weisse 3–8 2–3 1.028–1.032 1.003–1.006 2.8–3.8%
23 Flanders Red Ale 10–25 10–16 1.048–1.057 1.002–1.012 4.6–6.5%
23 Oud Bruin 20–25 15–22 1.040–1.074 1.008–1.012 4.0–8.0%
23 Lambic 0–10 3–7 1.040–1.054 1.001–1.010 5.0–6.5%
23 Gueuze 0–10 3–7 1.040–1.060 1.000–1.006 5.0–8.0%
23 Fruit Lambic 0–10 3–7 1.040–1.060 1.000–1.010 5.0–7.0%
24 Witbier 8–20 2–4 1.044–1.052 1.008–1.012 4.5–5.5%
24 Belgian Pale Ale 20–30 8–14 1.048–1.054 1.010–1.014 4.8–5.5%
24 Bière de Garde 18–28 6–19 1.060–1.080 1.008–1.016 6.0–8.5%
25 Belgian Blond Ale 15–30 4–7 1.062–1.075 1.008–1.018 6.0–7.5%
25 Saison (pale) (standard) 20–35 5–14 1.048–1.065 1.002–1.008 5.0–7.0%
25 Saison (dark) (standard) 20–35 15–22 1.048–1.065 1.002–1.008 5.0–7.0%
25 Saison (pale) (table) 20–35 5–14 1.048–1.065 1.002–1.008 3.5–5.0%
25 Saison (pale) (super) 20–35 5–14 1.048–1.065 1.002–1.008 7.0–9.5%
25 Belgian Golden Strong Ale 22–35 3–6 1.070–1.095 1.005–1.016 7.5–10.5%
26 Trappist Single 25–45 3–5 1.044–1.054 1.004–1.010 4.8–6.0%
26 Belgian Dubbel 15–25 10–17 1.062–1.075 1.008–1.018 6.0–7.6%
26 Belgian Tripel 20–40 4.5–7 1.075–1.085 1.008–1.014 7.5–9.5%
26 Belgian Dark Strong Ale 20–35 12–22 1.075–1.110 1.010–1.024 8.0–12.0%
27 Historical Beer: Gose 5–12 3–4 1.036–1.056 1.006–1.010 4.2–4.8%
27 Historical Beer: Kentucky Common 15–30 11–20 1.044–1.055 1.010–1.018 4.0–5.5%
27 Historical Beer: Lichtenhainer 5–12 3–6 1.032–1.040 1.004–1.008 3.5–4.7%
27 Historical Beer: London Brown Ale 15–20 22–35 1.033–1.038 1.012–1.015 2.8–3.6%
27 Historical Beer: Piwo Grodziskie 20–35 3–6 1.028–1.032 1.006–1.012 2.5–3.3%
27 Historical Beer: Pre-Prohibition Lager 25–40 3–6 1.044–1.060 1.010–1.015 4.5–6.0%
27 Historical Beer: Pre-Prohibition Porter 20–30 18–30 1.046–1.060 1.010–1.016 4.5–6.0%
27 Historical Beer: Roggenbier 10–20 14–19 1.046–1.056 1.010–1.014 4.5–6.0%
27 Historical Beer: Sahti 7–15 4–22 1.076–1.120 1.016–1.020 7.0–11.0%
28 Brett Beer NS NS NS NS NS
28 Mixed-Fermentation Sour Beer NS NS NS NS NS
28 Wild Specialty Beer NS NS NS NS NS
29 Fruit Beer NS NS NS NS NS
29 Fruit and Spice Beer NS NS NS NS NS
29 Specialty Fruit Beer NS NS NS NS NS
30 Spice, Herb, or Vegetable Beer NS NS NS NS NS
30 Autumn Seasonal Beer NS NS NS NS NS
30 Winter Seasonal Beer NS NS NS NS NS
31 Alternative Grain Beer NS NS NS NS NS
31 Alternative Sugar Beer NS NS NS NS NS
32 Classic Style Smoked Beer NS NS NS NS NS
32 Specialty Smoked Beer NS NS NS NS NS
33 Wood-Aged Beer NS NS NS NS NS
33 Specialty Wood-Aged Beer NS NS NS NS NS
34 Clone Beer NS NS NS NS NS
34 Mixed-Style Beer NS NS NS NS NS
34 Experimental Beer NS NS NS NS NS

Kellerbier Amber Kellerbier

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7C. Kellerbier: Amber Kellerbier
The original style of Kellerbier from the Franconia area of Germany. A much older style compared to the relatively more recent pale Helles-Style Kellerbier that is popular in the Munich area today.

Overall Impression:
A young, unfiltered, and unpasteurized beer that is between a Helles and Märzen in color, spicier in the hops with greater attenuation. Interpretations range in color and balance, but remain in the drinkable 4.8% ABV neighborhood. Balance ranges from the dry, spicy and pale-colored interpretations by St. Georgen and Löwenbräu of Buttenheim, to darker and maltier interpretations in the Fränkische Schweiz. This style is above all a method of producing simple drinkable beers for neighbors out of local ingredients to be served fresh. Balance with a focus on drinkability and digestibility is important.

Aroma:
Moderate intensity of German malt, typically rich, bready, somewhat toasty, with light bread crust notes. Moderately-low to moderate spicy peppery hop aroma. Very low to low diacetyl, occasionally low to moderately-low sulfur and very low green apple or other yeast-derived notes. Caramel, biscuity, or roasted malt aroma is inappropriate.

Appearance:
Moderately cloudy to clear depending on age, but never extremely cloudy or murky. Gold to deep reddish-amber color. Off-white, creamy head. When served on cask, can have low carbonation and very low head.

Flavor:
Initial malt flavor may suggest sweetness, but finish is moderately dry to dry, and slightly bitter. Distinctive and complex maltiness often includes a bready-toasty aspect. Hop bitterness is moderate to moderately high, and spicy or herbal hop flavor is low to moderately high. Balance can be either on the malt or hop side, but the finish is not sweet. Noticeable caramel or roasted malt flavors are inappropriate. Very low to low diacetyl. Possible very low green apple or other yeast-derived notes. Smooth, malty aftertaste.

Mouthfeel:
Medium body, with a creamy texture and medium carbonation. Fully fermented, without a sweet or cloying impression.

Comments:
The best examples of Amber Kellerbier are served only on tap at many of the small Franconia area breweries (as this is a beer best served fresh and the serving style being an important part of the style). Bottled versions are not likely to have the freshness, hop character and young beer notes exhibited by the draft versions.

History:
This was the classic, historical style before it was adapted in other areas. This original, older style of Kellerbier would have simply been beer served from local taverns that did not lager long enough to drop bright. Many breweries in Franconia would use some of this young beer during the summer months, for festivals such as the Annafest (est. 1840) in July in Forchheim, where it was traditional to drink directly from the lagering vessels.

Characteristic Ingredients:
Grist varies, although traditional German versions emphasized Franconian pale and color malt. The notion of elegance is derived from the high-quality local ingredients, particularly the malts. Spalt or other typically spicy local hops are most common. Frugal Franconian brewers rarely used decoction brewing due to the cost of energy.

Style Comparison:
Most commonly, this style is a young, unfiltered, unpasteurized, hoppier version of Munich Helles or Märzen. Fränkische Schweiz versions can edge up to dark amber or brown.

Vital Statistics:
OG: 1.048–1.054
IBUs: 25–40
FG: 1.012–1.016
SRM: 7–17
ABV: 4.8–5.4%

Commercial Examples:
(local) Greif, Eichhorn, Nederkeller, Hebendanz (bottled) Buttenheimer Kaiserdom Kellerbier, Kulmbacher Monchshof Kellerbier, Leikeim Kellerbier, Löwenbräu Kellerbier, Mahr’s Kellerbier, St. Georgen Kellerbier, Tucher Kellerbier Naturtrub

Kellerbier Pale Kellerbier

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7C. Kellerbier: Pale Kellerbier
A very common seasonal summer beer brewed by many of the Munich area breweries and served in the beer gardens, where they are very popular.

Overall Impression:
A young, fresh Helles, so while still a malty, fully-attenuated Pils malt showcase, the hop character (aroma, flavor and bitterness) is more pronounced, and the
beer is cloudy, often with some level of diacetyl, and possibly has some green apple and/or other yeast-derived notes. As with the traditional Helles, the Keller version is still a beer intended to be drunk by the liter, so overall it should remain a light, refreshing, easy drinking golden lager.

Aroma:
Moderately-low to moderately-high spicy, floral, or herbal hop aroma. Very low to moderate diacetyl, possible very low green apple or other yeast derived notes. Pleasantly grainy-sweet, clean malt aroma, with possible low background note of DMS.

Appearance:
Slight haze to moderately cloudy, but never extremely cloudy or murky. Medium yellow to pale gold color. Creamy white head with good persistence. When served on cask, can have low carbonation and very low head.

Flavor:
Moderately malty with a rounded, grainy-sweet profile. Low to moderately-high spicy, floral, or herbal hop flavor, with a moderate hop bitterness that can linger. Finish is crisp and dry, but the aftertaste remains malty. Very low to moderate diacetyl, which should always remain at a pleasant, drinkable level that balances somewhat with the other characteristics of the beer; overwhelming diacetyl is not appropriate. Possible very low green apple or other yeast derived notes, and possible low background note of DMS.

Mouthfeel:
Medium body. Low to medium carbonation. Depending on the level of yeast in suspension, it may assist in creating a slightly creamy texture. A slight slickness on the tongue may be present from the diacetyl.

Comments:
Most Pale Kellerbiers are young, unfiltered, unpasteurized versions of Munich Helles beer, although Pils or a different, custom golden lager beer designed specifically for serving young could also be used. The best examples are served only on tap at many of the Munich area breweries. Bottled versions are not likely to have the freshness, hop character and young beer notes exhibited by the draft versions.

History:
Modern adaptation from the traditional Franconian style, using Helles instead of Märzen. Today, a popular summer seasonal beer.

Characteristic Ingredients:
Pilsner malt, German hops, German lager yeast; same as a Munich Helles.

Style Comparison:
Most commonly, a young, unfiltered and unpasteurized version of a Munich Helles, though it can be a young, unfiltered and unpasteurized version of other golden German lagers, such as a Pilsner or a seasonal golden lager made specifically for serving young.

Vital Statistics:
OG: 1.045–1.05
IBUs: 20–35
FG: 1.008–1.012
SRM: 3–7
ABV: 4.7–5.4%

Commercial Examples:
(local) Paulaner, Paulaner Brauhaus, Hofbrau, Tegernseer Tal. (bottled) Ayinger Kellerbier, Hacker-Pschorr Munchner Kellerbier Anno 1417, Hofbrau Munchner Sommer Naturtrub, Wolnzacher Hell Naturtrüb